Best Ever Pork Roast and Sauerkraut

This pork roast is probably the very first roast I ever made on my own.  It was after both my Mom and Dad had passed on and it was my first New Year’s Eve with out them.  Now I was going out with friends that night however it’s a tradition in my family to have pork roast and sauerkraut on NYE.  Mom always said it was to bring us good luck and fortune. Yeah, we never had fortune or good luck but at least we had each other and to me that’s priceless!  Now this is the same woman who, every NYE would go outside at the crack of midnight, bang a wooden spoon on the back of a pot loudly 12 times (not sure why 12), put that down and then put some change in her purse, zip it shut and with her right arm (never left) swing it forward around and around like she was winding up to throw a strike.  I can still remember her saying “Lori Ann you always want to put in some change and swing it forward, never backwards.  By swinging it forward your capturing all the good fortune and bringing it towards you.”  Yeah.. that didn’t work either.

But while we never had money we had other “riches”. We had love, honor, respect and integrity.  We learned to rely on our God given talents – fortunately for me it all lied in my brain because God help me if we had to rely on my dancing capabilities.  HA!  I’m about as graceful as a rabid hippo on skates!  Yeah…ponder that image for a minute.  LOL

New year pork roast5

Now if you’re my age, you know…ancient and borderline senile per my darling husband, your parents or grandparents almost NEVER wrote down a recipe.  Am I right?  Well this is one of those recipes they never ever wrote down yet the first time I went to make it, it’s like I knew how to make it based off of all those years watching her cook it.  However when she made her it was not small and never just one.  There were at least 3 or 4 and they all weighed in about 7-8 pounds each.  Plus she would make a roaster full of kielbasa, hot dogs and more kraut, baked beans, potato salad, macaroni salad, brownies, a chocolate layered cake with her to-die-for pudding frosting, a huge tray of leftover Christmas cookies, fudge plus chips – potato chips and pretzels.  Yes.. we had all of that at midnight .. well after the obligatory pot banging and purse twirling.

Then we’d go to bed and get up the next day only to eat all over again.  No wonder all but one of us in the family ended up overweight.  Seriously… if I knew then what I know now about healthy eating and everything in moderation I could have been a ballerina.  HAHAHA yeah no.  There is no tu-tu for this child.  Maybe a four-four.. haha

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Now it’s funny because when I first made this on my own I omitted the onions because back then onions were the anti-christ of foods.  Kind of like cherries.  Well, yeah, cherries are still evil.  But onions, oh dear God I’d rather eat cat food than anything that had a visible piece of onion in it.  And for years while the pork was good, it was never “like Mom’s”.  About 10 or 15 years ago I started adding in pureed onions to the mix and eventually grew to just throwing in chopped onions that yes, when they were on my plate and visible I’d still eat them.  I actually have grown to love cooked onions.  Cherries on the other hand, no.. never.

Ever.. <blech!>

New year pork roast
So over the holidays I bought a 12lb pork roast from Sam’s club that I cut up into three-4 pound sections.  Since it’s just the two of us, that is way more than enough for us to both eat over several days.  And for years Mr. Fantabulous said he “wasn’t a pork fan” even though he’d inhale it every time I made it.  Now he no longer says that and will ask me to make pork.  Score for me as I love pork!  Like clockwork just like years gone by I made this for New Years for us with a side of my perfect mashed potatoes. It just goes together.

New year pork roast1

The trick to getting a super moist and juicy pork roast is searing it first.  Searing meat caramelizes the sugars and browns the proteins present in meat, resulting in more appealing color and flavor.  It lends to a deep flavor that just can’t be created with no amount of seasonings.  Searing over high heat caramelizes the surface of the meat, which enhances the savory ‘meat’ flavor and fills the finished dish with complex layers of nutty caramel and coffee-like bitterness. In technical terms, this is called a Maillard reaction and it’s a flavor profile we omnivores happen to find quite delicious. Without searing, meat dishes can taste flat and boring.

The meat should be at room temperature before searing and patted dry. The pan should be very hot and the goal is to keep the meat raw with just a browned surface. “A quick searing”. If you leave the meat in the pan too long or sear too much meat at a time, it will start to steam and you lose the benefits of searing. You’re trying to achieve what’s called the “Maillard Reaction”.  Per Wikipedia,  “high temperature, intermediate moisture levels, and alkaline conditions all promote the Maillard reaction. In cooking, low moisture levels are necessary mainly because water boils into steam at 212 °F (Crock Pot),  whereas the Maillard reaction happens noticeably around 310 °F (Very hot skillet): significant browning of food does not occur until all “surface” water is vaporized.”

New year pork roast2

Plus it looks way more sexier than a taupe colored piece of meat.  I mean to see those rich caramel colors glistening is kinda sexy in a meaty-kinda-way. LOL  It draws you in and since we eat with our eyes first, it makes you want it, crave it.

Admit it, this looks so scrumptious.  Like you can tell just by looking at the pictures that it’s juicy, succulent and tender. And unless you can’t eat pork for whatever reason, you’re gonna want this… over and over and over!  Trust me.  THIS is the pork that converted Mr. “I don’t like pork very much” to Mr. “Honey can you make that pork roast again?”

New year pork roast3

Now this dish you can make in the crock pot on low for about 8-9 hours however I love it roasted in the oven. When I make it for a crowd I’ll still pan sear it but will just throw everything in the crock and set it on low while I go about my business.  It’s still just as amazing but I don’t know, there’s just something more sensual about the dish when you pull it out of the oven and you see it all tender and juicy.

Wait, sorry about that… I got sidetracked.  Someone just sent me the trailer for “Magic Mike XXL” and well yeah.. *blush*  Dear Lord he’s so pretty!  LOL  I mean Mr. Fantabulous .. he’s so pretty!  Love you baby!  LOL  But seriously.. WHO MOVES LIKE THAT???  I swear Channing Tatum is pure fluid when he dances.  Like he has no bones about him to move so damn easily.  God I’d love to dance like that.  Trust me I try my hardest and in my head it makes sense “extend arm this way, swirl hips in this motion and pop ‘n lock this move” and all I end up with is looking like I’m having a damn seizure. #sojealous!  New year pork roast4

Anyway, where was I?  Meat… Channing Tatum… oh wait, PORK!  LOL  *blush*  Yeah I know I’m bad but you love me.  Now the trick with this roast is once you pull it out of the oven, you need to remove it from the pan and loosely cover it with foil. Do you know why you do this?  Why you partially cover meat and let it rest after roasting?   Meat proteins are heated during cooking, they coagulate and squeeze out some of the moisture inside their coiled structures and in the spaces between the individual molecules. This drives moisture toward the surface and the center of the meat. As meat proteins cook, they begin to shrink. Up to 120°F, the proteins shrink in diameter only and there is little moisture loss, but above 120°F the proteins also begin to shrink in length, which really puts the squeeze on moisture. By 170°F, most of the moisture will be squeezed out of a lean piece of meat. As meat rests, this process is partially reversed. The moisture that is driven toward the center of the meat is redistributed as the protein molecules relax and are able to reabsorb some moisture. As a result, less juice runs out of the meat when you cut into it per the author of Cook Wise.

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But enough about that learnin’ stuff, I’m hungry and strangely so in the mood to watch Magic Mike.  *grin*  LOL  But seriously if you want the Best Ever Pork Roast with Sauerkraut or what we call New Year’s Eve Pork and Sauerkraut, make this.  It’s EPIC!  Mama would be proud of me with this.

New year pork roast8

4.8 from 40 reviews
Best Ever Pork Roast and Sauerkraut
 
Author:
 
Find more fantabulous recipes, tips and tricks at www.thekitchenwhisperer.net. Also, join our TKW Family on Facebook
Ingredients
  • 4 pound pork roast - boneless and at room temperature (this is important!) - this should take about 20-30 minutes from being in the fridge
  • 2 pounds sauerkraut (I do not rinse mine)
  • 1 Tbl caraway seeds *note - you can omit this if you hate caraway seeds but for me it makes the dish
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onion
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 cup water *optional
  • 2 Tbl olive oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 325F, rack in the middle.
  2. Pat the pork dry and sprinkle the entire roast with salt, pepper and smoked paprika
  3. Heat a large non-stick pan over medium-high heat and add in the olive oil.
  4. When the olive oil starts to simmer carefully place the pork roast in.
  5. Sear on all sides until golden brown - ~5-8 minutes per side.
  6. In a lidded 6qrt Dutch Oven place the sauerkraut all over the bottom.
  7. Sprinkle over the caraway seeds, onions and brown sugar.
  8. Place the seared pork roast on top nestling it in the sauerkraut.
  9. If you’ve drained yours sauerkraut, add the water. If you did not you do not need the water.
  10. Cover tightly with a lid and bake for about 2 hours or until a meat thermometer reads 150F.
  11. Remove from the oven.
  12. Carefully remove the roast from the pan and place on a cutting board covering loosely with foil.
  13. Allow to cool for about 15 minutes before slicing.
Notes
If you want to make this in the crock pot, pan sear the meat following the recipe and in the bottom of a 6qrt crock pot add in the sauerkraut, caraway seeds, onions, brown sugar and pork (water if you drained the kraut). Cover and cook on low for about 8-9 hours.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: serves 6

 

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159 Responses to “Best Ever Pork Roast and Sauerkraut”

  • Frenchi91 says:

    Any suggestions for individual chops?

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi! You could cut the chops down from the pork roast, sear on both sides and then bake for 40-50 minutes (depending on the thickness of your chops). Just be sure to check the internal temp of the pork – it should read ~145F.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Deborah Dallatore says:

    Just wondering if the salt can be eliminated on the roast since the sauerkraut is so salty and if this will effect the taste in any way? Been making this for years but just cannot seem to get it like my mom’s and of course there is no recipe left by her. I’m sure she learned from her mom. My grandmother was from France and we had some awesome Sunday dinners at her house! Since you mentioned that apples go well in this dish I’m going to add some. Making it tonight.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Deborah,

      You can though but since you’re adding some brown sugar (or apples) to the sauerkraut you’re removing some of that brine-y taste. The salt is used to help season the meat and infuses into the sear/crust on it. It doesn’t really impact the salt level of the kraut since it’s such a small amount.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Gil says:

    I’m From the south and our new years dish is cabbage pork and black eye peas. Living in pa for years I have grown to like the pork and sauerkraut. In fact as I write this I’m finishing up our p&s from New Years. My wife makes this quite a bit during the winter and it is a wonderful meal to have on a cold day for dinner. We will try your suggestion for this gray meal!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Gil!

      How did you guys make your black eye peas? We have a bunch of TKW Family members from the south that eats the same as you did – pork, cabbage and the peas.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Annette says:

    This is a great recipe! I left out the carroway seeds (not for me, but hubby doesn’t like them) and added about half the brown sugar called for- just because we prefer more tang and less sweet. (Plus the holiday season has added some pounds we could stand to lose!) My husband used to be a kraut hater, but has recently discovered he likes it in certain applications. This was a major league home run in our house. The leftovers were polished off the next day! Will definitely add this to my fav list!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Thank you so much Annette; I really appreciate it! OMG don’t I know it about the holiday season and that “OMG when did my pants shrink???” issue. That’s awesome this was a huge hit in your house!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Jo says:

    I am cooking 2 pork roasts- one 4 lbs and the other 5 lbs. I want to cook them together in the same roasting pan with the sauerkraut Do I need to cook them longer thN 2 or 21/2 hours because they are in the same pan?

  • Liz says:

    I made this today in the slow cooker and it definitely lived up to its name- it was the best pork and sauerkraut recipe I’ve ever had! Thank you!

  • Liz says:

    I made this recipe in the slow cooker tonight and it definitely lived up to its name- it’s the best!

  • Felice Shenkosky says:

    I have the Ninja seari-ous cooking system. Seared the pork roast in it on stovetop high setting, removed the meat, added everything else, but added 1/2 can of beer and cut up apple. Nestled the roast back in and turned to oven setting. I found it to be boiling so I turned it to crockpot high for 4 hours. Later I’ll make garlic red potatoes, brussel sprouts, and dumplings dropped into the roast liquid (made from biscuits). Cheers and Happy New Year!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Oh cool Felice! I have their Nutri-Ninja Blender Duo with Auto-IQ and love it! Love your adaptation!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Shaunna Baker says:

    Made this for our New Years dinner. Followed recipe exactly. Turned out so delicious and moist. Even our picky eater ate all of hers! Will be keeping this recipe for sure! So great!!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Now that makes me smile Shaunna when I hear one of my recipes is picky-eater approved! 🙂 Thank you so much!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

      • Nancy I says:

        Found your recipe via Google. Which let me to your blog. Which I had to read throughly and then throughly enjoyed the stories! Now I’m waiting for lunch to enjoy leftovers of your most excellent recipe! Love the analytical reasoning behind the recipes! I’m hooked!

        • TKWAdmin says:

          Hi Nancy!

          First, welcome to the TKW Family! Pull up a kitchen chair and let’s chat! Second, thank you so much for your comments, I really appreciate it! The analytical reasoning – see I told my family that being a dual engineer would come in handy some day *wink* lol Actually it has helped me out so much when I create recipes. It allows me to look at flavor combinations, measurements and the like differently.

          Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Tammy says:

    This was sooooo good! I made it today for New Years. Yum!! Thank you for such a delicious recipe. I’m definitely making this my go to pork dish for New Years from now on.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      WOO HOO! That’s awesome to hear Tammy! So happy you loved it! Mom would be so happy to hear that 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Kendra Riley says:

    Happy New Year from Hummelstown, PA. Grew up eating this and still do! I’ve made it all different ways, sometimes I slice an apple in my sour kraut, or mix a bit of apple sauce just to take the edge off (depends what sour kraut I use). I always add some good beer in my pan though for the moisture rather than water. This recipe I do like but I reduce the brown sugar quite a bit, I prefer a bite to mine, less sweet than this. But still very good! Thanks for sharing!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Kendra!

      Yeah you can totally lower the sugar on this or if you like your kraut with lots of bite, omit it. I’ve added apples with it as well as pork with apples and onions is classic! So happy you liked it!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Ruth says:

    I just made your recipe and it came out perfect! I grew up in Pa as well. Now I live in FL with my husband and kids and I’ve always kept the tradition of pork and sauerkraut on New Year’s Day! It’s a great meal with mashed potatoes after a long night of partying on New Year’s Eve! Thanks for the great recipe!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      That’s great news Ruth, thank you! Yep, gotta have mashed taters with this!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Ally says:

    Very excited to get this baby out of the oven. I nestled my kielbasa up next to it. Gonna be soooo yummy!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      OMG I did the same thing today too! I had a package of kielbasa in the fridge and threw it in with it. OMG that kielbasa was off the hook today!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Sherry Chapko says:

    TKWAdmin., Thank you, thank you, thank you, for this recipe; but more for the story of your memories written here about the good ole days of way back when! I found myself nodding in agreement with my own past similar memories! How precious they’ve become! I laughed till I cried, reading your notes here! So, on to make this delicious looking pork roast

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Aw Sherry, thank you so much. It’s comment like yours – where you smile, even laugh out loud mean the most to me. I love it that you’re able to relate and have the “same here” moments. So thank you for the huge smile you put on my face!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Michelle says:

    Mine’s in the oven. Can’t wait to try it. Headed back to the kitchen to whip up your potatoes, too. Hope it comes out as delicious as yours! I’ll let you know. Thanks for the entertaining post!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Oh we’re having dinner together Michelle – mine’s in the oven too *wink* I’m sure you’ll knock it out of the park!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Jeanne says:

    Hi- I am a last minute, 1st time cooker of pork. I just picked up a 2 lb. roast, have no dutch oven & hope to pull this off with a heavy ceramic baking pan & foil. What temp. & how long should I cook this boneless, 2 lb. pork loin? Thanks & enjoying the banter & traditions of my home state of pennsylvania

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Jeanne,

      Okay double wrap the foil then. I’m thinking 2 pounds will be about 1.5 hours for boneless. The biggest thing is make sure you put the foil snug around the pan. You don’t want steam getting out – that’ll help keep the pork tender and juicy.

      You got this 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Laura says:

    This also brought a smile to my face with many memories of NYE in PA! Still live in the great old state, Johnstown, PA…just put my pork in the oven using your recipe! I will left you know in a few hours how it goes! I know it will be amazing! Happy New Year and Thank You!!!

  • Judy wa says:

    Oh man was I happy to find your recipe. I have been making sauerkraut and pork for years but it was just not quit like my Grandma’s. It is now thanks to you Paula.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR. cheers to you.

  • Jeff says:

    A search for “pork and sauerkraut recipe” on google, and you’ve pulled into the number two slot. That’s amazing!! Can’t wait to taste this tonight.

  • Joyce says:

    OMG!
    I just ran into it by accident while I’m preparing my usual porkroast recipe. I am in love with this already and will make this tomorrow!

  • SS says:

    Any ideas on a caraway substitute?? I found this recipe last minute, it’s going in the crock pot and I don’t have caraway on hand. Google was less than helpful.
    I thought I’d see if anyone has made this with an alternate spice.

    • BillW says:

      I was in the same boat, no caraway seed. So I’m using celery seed. I’m sure it will be fine but I’m picking up caraway seed next time I’m at the store.

      • TKWAdmin says:

        Hi Bill!

        The caraway seed is optional – it’s just something my Mom always used. Some people hate it, some love it – kinda like cilantro or programming in C++ 🙂

        Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

    • Jody says:

      I think it’s better with out the caraway seeds so you can leave them out if you would like. But that’s just my opinion.

      • TKWAdmin says:

        Hi Jody,

        Most definitely – caraway seed is honestly an optional item. I add it because well, that’s how it came from the old country in my family and how Mom made it. I prefer it but you can easily leave it out.

        Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

    • SS says:

      Well, I ended up leaving the caraway out, and this dish is FANTASTIC! I will try it in the future with the caraway, but for anyone else who doesn’t have caraway on hand, make it anyway…you won’t be sorry! Excited to check out the rest of your recipes!

      • TKWAdmin says:

        WOO HOO! That’s great to hear, thank you! Yeah the caraway seeds I’ll update to optional as some folks really just don’t like it. I personally do and that’s how Mom made it. So happy you loved it!

        Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Paula says:

    Rodney IS CORRECT! I’ve been trained/certified for 43 years and EXPERIENCED! and although many food protection requirements HAVE changed, …resting at room temp for 20-30 minutes will NOT harm ANYONE unless the meat was 1) not fresh when you bought it, 2) left out of the refrigerator for an extended period of time when brought from from the market, 3) you have a dirty kitchen or area in which you are resting the meat! PERIOD!
    Perfect recipe TKW! And truly a traditional one! Been a New Years Day tradition in our family for 60+ years!
    HAppy New Year! May 2017 be FILLED with love, prosperity, and health!

    • Tanya says:

      Does anyone know if I can do this in the oven in a covered roasting pan instead of a Dutch oven?

      • TKWAdmin says:

        Hi Tanya!

        As long as you have a tight seal then yes you can. What I would even suggest is perhaps adding foil over the top of the pan and then the lid. The premise of the dutch oven is that is helps to contain the steam thus aiding in the moisture and slow cooking of the roast. For the roasting pan I would suggest also adding the water (even if you didn’t drain your kraut).

        Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

      • nj says:

        Yes. A baking dish with tight foil will work.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Thank you so much Paula! Wishing you and yours a healthy, happy and blessed New Year!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • BillW says:

    Unlike you I DID write down my mom’s recipe but as usual, it didn’t matter because no one ever cooks like “Mom”. After years of making New Year’s Day pork and sauerkraut for good luck and fortune (plus I liked it), I decided to go looking for an alternate recipe. When I happened upon yours, I had to go and check your last name because I could have sworn we were related based on the description of the NY eve and day traditions. I had a good laugh because I forgot about the wooden spoon and the change in the purse and swinging it. Anyway, I’m about to try out your recipe.
    Just to add some fun to the discussion of the dangers of raw meat… whenever my mom made hamburgers or meatloaf, she would always take a small amount of raw ground beef, ball it up, put salt on it and eat it before continuing. I’ve had it numerous times that way myself. Years later I heard about steak tartare and thought my mom had invented it. Ha!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      HAHAHA You so made me smile Bill! I had a neighbor that would do that with ground beef as well! She called them “Carnivore Sandwiches” – just raw ground meat, salt and pepper between white bread. I can’t do it…but then I’m that girl that likes no pink in her steak. The only pink I want is from ketchup 😉 haha

      And I’m glad it brought a smile to your face and made you laugh 🙂 Ah the things our parents did as traditions, huh?

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • ralph says:

    any adjustments if I’m using a boned piece of pork loin?

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Ralph!

      Bone-in should be 20-25 min per pound. Boneless takes a bit longer. The reason being the bone will actually retain and hold heat thus cooking it faster.

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

      • ralph says:

        Thank you, it came out great, I used a slow cooker, probably similar to a dutch oven, you just plug it in is all, and just used a thermometer to where it was 140-150 degrees.took about 2 hours at 325. awesome and the pork was real tender. I may try the foil next time under the lid to seal in the steam as the lid isn’t super tight, but it did come out great. But you are right, searing it is the key. Happy new year to all.

        • TKWAdmin says:

          Oh great idea! I’m so happy this turned out great for you! Yeah you can definitely make this in the slow cooker like what you did.

          Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Jimi Moore says:

    All of what your mum did is pure pennsylvania dutch traditional . Love it. My recipe to the T

    • TKWAdmin says:

      I can remember Jimi when I was wee little in our kitchen was a PA Dutch plaque we had hanging in our kitchen. I grew up on the outskirts of Pittsburgh. This is her recipe and for me, simply perfect.

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Bonnie DeNardo says:

    Jeez….it takes me 30 minutes to get home from the store, 30-60 minutes to shop and lord knows with kids and let’s and everything else in the world that takes precedence, it’s a wonder I haven’t died yet from spoiled warm meat.
    Recipe is wonderful!!!!! Thank you ❤
    Pennsylvania

    • TKWAdmin says:

      🙂 Thank you so much Bonnie! I respect everyone’s input and opinion. That’s one thing I believe in here with the TKW Family – everyone has a voice. I did clarify the recipe and put a 20-30 minute meaning about the room temperature thing. It’s just every single chef’s site – food network, epicurious, bon appetite and so forth – every single one also mentions cooking meat when it’s at room temperature. I would think their lawyers and editors would strike any misinformation from being conveyed, no?

      You sound like you shop like me – my grocery store is about 30 min away and I shop a good 45 minutes plus I hit up multiple stores. Now granted in the warmer months I take a freezer bag with ice packs for times like that as well, common sense should come in to play ya know?

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Louanne says:

    Enjoyed story about swing purse on New Year Eve my gram did same thing but got hay from manger at church and put it in purse with change.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      OMG I love the hay from the manager story! I so love family traditions!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Leah says:

    Just made your meal and watched my fiancé practically lick his plate (I grew up in Pennsylvania eating pork and sauerkraut at new year’s, he has never heard of such a thing being from Washington.) thank you for this recipe! Definitely bookmarked for next time!

    • Leah says:

      PS I loved the imagery of your post! Totally brought me home for a few minutes and I laughed out loud the whole time I read it! Happy New Year!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      That’s awesome! Thank you so much! It’s funny how areas have their own local ‘traditions’ when it comes to certain foods. Hopefully you have some leftovers though 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Toni says:

    I always bring meat to room temperature before cooking. If you think about it, it makes perfect sense. If I tried to cook a cold piece of meat, half of the cooking time would be spent bringing it to room temperature, not cooking.
    I do the same with anything I make ahead of time, or has been refrigerated.

  • Theresa Lash says:

    Bringing the pork roast up to room temp right now. Feel like a real pa Dutch local now. Lititz pa.
    Ty

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Theresa!

      So I had to google Lititz, PA.. OMG what a CUTE little town! Super adorable!

      Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

      • Natalie Bennett says:

        Also in Lititz, PA! It is a wonderful town. My husband asked me to make the pork and sauerkraut differently this year (instead of all mixed together in a crockpot – he wants to be able to taste the pork and not just the sauerkraut) and I think this fits the bill. Just put it in the oven. Thanks!

        • TKWAdmin says:

          Oh cool Natalie! I’m going to have to venture to Lititz some day! You’ll get the kraut flavor but you’ll still be able to separate the pork flavors from the kraut.

          Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

  • Alissa says:

    Is no one going to mention that there’s never a time you should allow raw meat to get to room temperature!? Please don’t do that. That’s how you get sick and spoil meat.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Actually Alissa that’s not 100% true. Now what I didn’t state is how long to let it set out to come to room temperature. Unless you keep your house arctic cold it should only take 20-30 minutes to take that chill off and get it room temperature. I assumed folks would check their meat after say 25-30 minutes since this is the norm in any meat cooking in my post and that people would not let it set out all day long. I’ll tweak that in my recipe.

      However if you try and cook any meat that is straight from the fridge you cause the muscles and fibres in the meat to seize up and become tough.

      If you don’t believe me then check out http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/articles/bobby-flay-s-top-ten-grilling-tips.html, http://www.finecooking.com/item/30438/roasting-meat or anything else on Google.

      Happy New Year and Best Kitchen Wishes!

    • ron schmit says:

      Meat CANNOT spoil in 20-30 mins, unless your kitchen is filthy, even then not unlikely. I’ve been doing that all my life and we’ve never had a problem. Game hunters carry dead ducks and pheasants for hours and no one is harmed. Relax.

      • Alissa says:

        No one has their panties in a bunch. Sorry that I saw a recipe and since I’ve been trained and certified in food for 12 years I know that room temperature raw meats are a huge no no. My bad for warning less experienced people who may not know that’s its not ok to do.

        • Rondey says:

          Alissa…you may want to get recertified with ServSafe or at least reread your book [I am pulling this info from my ServSafe: Food Protection Manager Certification]. You should not let raw meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs exposed to room temperatures for more than 2 hours (1 hour if the room temperature is more than 90 degrees F). Exposing meat to room temperature for only 20 to 30 minutes is not going to harm anything. Surface bacteria will barely have time to multiple before the meat is seared in a hot pan (thus killing them) and then the meat will be further roasted in the oven.

          • Paula says:

            Rodney is CORRECT! Much has change with food safety, but 20-30 minutes will NOT HARM ANYONE! (Certified 43 years and current)
            Unless, 1) meat was not fresh to begin with, 2) extended time out of refrigeratation from market to home, 3) DIRTY kitchen or place where meat will be resting.
            TRUE: meat should be room temp when wearing- unless you like jerky!
            Perfect recipe and instructions! Almost exact to our 80 year traditional, brought from the old country, must have NEW YEARS DAY feast at our home.
            Readers, feel confident you won’t be disappointed in this.
            Happy New Year filled with health, happiness and prosperity

            • TKWAdmin says:

              Yep… that’s how this recipe originated in my family – from my Mom’s family from Slovenia. I’m putting this in the oven as I type.

              Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

        • TKWAdmin says:

          No Alissa I appreciate your input, really I do. It pointed out that I took some basic know-how that I assumed most people knew about letting meat sit out that it did not mean all day. That’s why I updated the recipe to say 20-30 minutes. So thank you for that. At times I forget that not everyone knows even the basics (i.e., never put flour directly in hot liquid and whisk as you’ll always get lumps).

          EVERYONE here at the TKW Family has a voice as how it should be.

          Best Kitchen Wishes and Happy New Year!

    • Jimi Moore says:

      Google sorry but you are wrong

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