Super Soft ‘n Chewy Hoagie Rolls

Depending on what part of the country, or world, you’re from these things are called various names.  I’ve heard “Subs, Submarines, Hoagies, Grinders, Hero, Italian Sandwich, Torpedo, Blimpie, Po’ Boy and Rocket” just to name a few.  However you call it, I’m talking about those luxurious sandwiches full of meats and cheeses then wedged into this chewy, soft bread roll.

At first cut, the bread insides are so soft and billowy.  It’s as it it’s held together by pockets of air and strands of sweet dough.  Mmmm…

Well, now you no longer have to order out or buy them at the bakery.  These are SUPER simple to make and oh-so-good!

Soft ‘n Chewy Hoagie Rolls


4.9 from 150 reviews
Super Soft 'n Chewy Hoagie Rolls
 
Author:
 
Find more fantabulous recipes, tips and tricks at www.thekitchenwhisperer.net. Also, join our TKW Family on Facebook
Ingredients
  • 4 cups bread flour
  • 1 3/8 cups warm water (110-115F degrees) *See note
  • 2 Tbl sugar
  • 1 Tbl active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 Tbl cold butter, cubed
Instructions
  1. Add the yeast, sugar and 3/8 cup warm water in a bowl of a stand mixer.
  2. Using a whisk or spoon, mix and set aside for 5-10 minutes or until the yeast has bubbled quite a bit.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook (this would be the same bowl your yeast mixture is in) add in the flour and remaining cup of water. Start off on low.
  4. Mix for 4 minutes.
  5. Add in the salt and mix for 5-6 minutes until the dough is slack (See note). At this point your mixer should be at medium speed.
  6. Add in the butter and mix for 1-3 minutes or until the dough comes back together.
  7. Remove from bowl and transfer to a greased, covered bowl until doubled in size. ~1 hour.
  8. Divide into 8 pieces and shape. I would advise using as little flour as possible when shaping these. The more flour you add, the tougher the hoagies will be.
  9. Transfer to a sprayed, parchment lined tray and cover.
  10. Allow to rise again. ~30-45 minutes.
  11. Preheat oven to 375 and bake for 16-23 minutes or until golden brown.
  12. Allow to cool before cutting with a quality bread knife ( Sani-Safe S162-8SC-PCP 8" Scalloped Bread Knife with Polypropylene Handle Pan )
Notes
3/8 cup is equal to 6 Tbl 🙂

Slack dough means when then dough cannot hold a shape; it has no elasticity or spring back at all. It’s wet dough but not too wet. It’s “billowy”. The dough is super, super soft and smooth.

Equipment: I would HIGHLY recommend using a quality bread knife to slice these as the rolls are soft and chewy and nothing is worse when cutting into them with a crappy knife! You'll love this knife! Sani-Safe S162-8SC-PCP 8" Scalloped Bread Knife with Polypropylene Handle Pan

300 Responses to “Super Soft ‘n Chewy Hoagie Rolls”

  • Deb says:

    Made these this weekend and they were amazing, We ate only two and I put the rest in a ziplock bag on the counter. Next day used them for sausage sandwiches and they were already drying out. I realize no preservatives but can you make any storage solutions or way to avoid only getting one day use out of them? Would love to be able to use threes for my husbands packed lunches, Thanks! LOVE your recipes!

  • jules says:

    I’ve triedmany bun and roll recipes but haven’t found one I love until now. These turned out great. Thanks

  • l kruse says:

    This one’s a keeper! Made these for French dips and they were excellent, but veered off course of instructions like this:
    1) Mixed 1 cup water, yeast, and sugar in a small bowl to rise about 10 minutes.
    2) Placed flour & salt in Kitchenaid bowl, then added melted butter and 1/2 cup hot water. Mixed together with beater for 1 minute, just until combined.
    3) Added bubbly water/yeast/sugar mixture to flour mixture and mixed until all incorporated.
    4) Changed from beater to dough hook and kneaded for 3 minutes with speed at 8.

    Call me lazy or efficient, I don’t care, but this was super easy and my family all wants these again!

    (I also added 2 tsp onion powder, 1 tsp garlic powder, & 1 tsp basil – yummy with French dip!)

    • TKWAdmin says:

      HAHAHA hey if it works for you, awesome! Love your adaptation! I’m just thrilled that you love them! And I do the same thing with the seasonings too!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Brigette says:

    I bake bread multiple times a week, but when I tried this recipe once before it didn’t go well. I was concerned the dough was too dry and I had kneaded it for too long, and since it was not slack the butter did not incorporate well. Since there were so many great reviews, I really wanted to give this a second try. I live in southern California and ended up needing to add quite a few tablespoons more of warm water than directed, which I added before the salt step. That did the trick and the rolls came out great! Seeing the recently added picture links in the comments helped a lot too. These rolls will make a mean shrimp poboy.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Brigette!

      Yes where folks live, the humidity and house temp can really play on the slack/wetness of the dough. But great thinking to add more warm water in!

      I’m thrilled these turned out awesome for you as I absolutely love these rolls! And yes they rock a po’boy!

      When you make one snap a pic and tag us in it or use hashtag #thekitchenwhisperer I’d love to see yours!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Janica says:

    These look so good! I am trying to make the dough – but I am having some issues…I was wondering if the remaining cup of water needs to be 110-115 degrees, and does it matter if it is added before or after the flour?

    Also – if the dough isn’t slack enough – the TBLs of water added later to try to help it be slack, would that be warm water or regular temp water is fine?

    This would help me out a lot!

    Thanks!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Janica!

      Yes the remaining cup of water needs to be 110-115 degrees and when you add it you add it when you add in the flour.

      If after 5-6 minutes the dough is just not turning slack, yes the water should be warm like above. It helps with the yeast. The hardest part of this recipe in all honesty is learning that it does take some time to get it to a slack consistency. The elements in your house can affect the time – too hot, too cold, too humid… it’s like a veritable 3 Little bears story. Once you find what’s right in your house, it’ll work seamlessly.

      For guidance, check out these 2 links on what slack dough should look like. http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/slackdough.jpg or http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/slackdough1.jpg

      Just be patient and you’ll get there 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

      • KarenB says:

        Looking at the pictures of the “slack ” dough (did you make up that word? Lol) the first picture looks like something I just cleaned up from my puppy accident lol but I see how it looks like it needs flour…is that what you mean?

  • Mike says:

    I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong, but I’ve tried this twice and both times have had issues with getting to “slack” dough. I measured the ingredients as accurately as I could. one cup plus 3 oz of water (1 3/8 cups). When mixing (before adding the salt) the dough comes together quickly. It is not soft at all. I mixed it well past the 6 minutes listed in the recipe hoping that it would loosen up, but it never does. I’m thinking I’m doing something wrong, but I don’t know what. Any ideas?

    Should the dough be very wet when initially mixing the flour and water? Maybe I just need more water to loosen things up.

    Thanks!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Mike,

      I’m working on trying to create a video of making this recipe. I think it’s one that you kind of have to “see” what the slack dough looks like. However when it comes to creating videos it’s brand new to me so I’m learning that process. Now on to the dough, depending on where you live you may need to add a bit more water. Outside items like humidity and temperature can greatly affect dough – even as much as the water itself. So if it’s not slack add a few Tbl more water until it becomes slack. Your dough should looks like this:

      http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/slackdough.jpg or http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/slackdough1.jpg

      See how they are billowy and really don’t hold a shape? They are almost blobish. If after 6 minutes you don’t get that add more water. Just watch that you don’t overwork the dough as it will turn out super dense and instead of making bread you’ll make a rock.

      Now if you lived in Pittsburgh and new how to make videos I’d show you in person for helping me make these videos 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

      • KarenB says:

        Lori, does it matter what the elevation of where you live or the type of flour you use? Some swear by bread flour or King Arthur and others use just generic store brand AP flour b

      • Mike says:

        Thank you for the pictures. That helps. I think that I’ll need to add quite a bit more water to get that consistency. I’ll try again soon.

        Even though things didn’t work exactly like the recipe, the rolls were a hit with when I served cheesesteaks to my family. Everyone was happy 🙂

  • THOMAS TUBENS says:

    In order to top rolls w/ herbs do I brush tops w/ butter or eggs & when do I brush them ? Thanks in advance.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Thomas,

      Brush them with an egg wash and add the herbs BEFORE baking. Eggs will give it a shine, milk/butter will give it a darker color (brown it).

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • KarenB says:

    Made prime rib last night and wanted French dip but no hoagie rolls and did not want to go to the store. Thus, had everything to make these and threw it all in the bread machine. Hopefully it comes out as good as yours look!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hey Karen,

      You got this! The biggest thing is you have to make sure the dough is slack (see the notes for what Slack means/looks like). If you have that, you’ll have a super soft and chewy roll. Let me know how it goes!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

      • KarenB says:

        Hi Lori!
        It turned out beautiful. The rolls are rising now with a flour sack dish towel on top of it. Probably 10 more minutes. Then they’ll be popped in the oven. I will snap a pic for FB and post when all done.

  • Delle says:

    Glad i found this recipe.I want to try make some philly cheesesteaks.My question is that i only have bread machine yeast,will it work with the quantity listed.

    Thanks

  • These are just PERFECT! And they stayed soft and oh so wonderful for 3 good days! Mine looked just like yours but I do bake so maybe that was why. But again PERFECT! Thanks for sharing this!

  • Thomas Park says:

    Can it be use for making burger and hot dog buns?

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Thomas,

      You can though I prefer a heartier bun myself. They are super light and airy which make them perfect for hoagies and subs. Burgers and dogs you may want a bun that can withstand the weight of the meat.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Jenny says:

    This was a great recipe. I did not want to go to the store for the meatballs subs I was making today and this recipe was perfect for them!!

  • Kate says:

    Is there a way to do this when kneading by hand? I do not have a bread machine or a stand mixer. How long should I knee by hand to get the right consistency dough?

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Kate!

      I’ll be honest it’s taxing on the hands (while still therapeutic) to make this by hand. I personally wouldn’t recommend it as with the mixer it can take about 20 minutes to get the dough to the slack stage. A very rough estimate if you want to make it by hand I would estimate about 25-35 minutes easily.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Chahira says:

    I made these buns couple days ago…it was amazing…thanks for the recipe

  • Autumn says:

    I followed your instructions using my kitchenaid mixer and these came out like mini loaves of homemade white bread. While they were delicious, they were too heavy and chewy for sandwiches… not billowy… what did I do wrong? My dough was never slack… it became stiff, elastic and smooth within a few minutes of mixing…

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Autumn,

      How long did you let the bread mix? 15-20 minutes total to mix. I becomes slack at the 6-12 minute mark. You have to work through it. However if it never goes to slack during that time, you can add a bit more water (Tbl at a time) Humidity and temperature will affect dough. Give it another shot and just be patient. You got this!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Mina says:

    Hi there,
    I recently had a sub standard Philly steak roll but the bread was nice. I don’t think it was a hoagie roll, just nice soft one. I will be making your rolls this morning. And then continuing on and trying out to make a better Philly steak roll.
    The question I have is about flour. I live in South Africa. Until recently we could only get Cake flour – I assume that’s your all purpose flour. Now I can buy bread flour – assume that has more gluten than the cake flour. In a recipe like this would a bread flour be better? Im going to try it with the cake flour this morning but I like to improve on my baking so if you think bread flour would be better I’ll try it with that as well.
    Thank you for your recipe. I often feel immensely jealous when watching TV or reading blogs and recipes by people in USA. You seem to have an incredible amount of choice on your supermarkets. We have nice shops but I think not a much choice.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Mina!

      No all purpose flour is different than cake flour. You need to use bread flour only in this recipe. It has a higher gluten count which leads to that chewy sub roll we all know and love. I’d LOVE to visit South Africa some day!

      So one of the things I have become rather cognizant of is that not every ingredient I use is readily available globally. If you see an ingredient in my recipe that you can’t get locally, contact me and I can help you with a viable substitute! Now with regards to flours, check out this section of my site: http://www.thekitchenwhisperer.net/category/tips-and-tricks/flours/

      There I show you how to make your own cake flour, bread flour and so forth.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

    • Boot says:

      Yeah, Hooray for capitalism!

  • Steve says:

    I have tried this twice and both times my bread looked like strombolis. Should I not punch down before second rise ?

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Steve,

      I only punch it down before the 2nd rise IF I am going to refrigerate the dough overnight. Even then when I bring it out of the fridge, I shape it and let it rise. It doesn’t really rise in the fridge much.

      What is the texture like though – I’m thinking almost dense if you’re saying like a stromboli. What I would do is after the first rise, pour it out of the bowl (by doing so, it’ll deflate naturally without really agitating it much like punching would), shape it and then let it rise. That would alleviate your strombili issue. Let me know, k?!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

      • Steve says:

        posted on your homepage and not sure I did that right. However I have made these several times since and they are great.I never buy rolls again. thanks

  • Erin says:

    I was so excited to try these (as I am with every bread recipe) but once again they came out tasteless. The texture was fine. They were a little lumpy, but I don’t think it was slack enough when I added my butter… And lumps are ok if it tastes good… But these didn’t! Can’t knock your recipe though, because most of the yeast breads I’ve made are tasteless :o/ and I haven’t been able to figure out what I’m doing wrong.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Erin 🙂

      Lumpy? As in how? Lumps of flour or…? I’ve never had lumpy bread. And there’s a good bit (not a lot) of salt in the recipe that will bring out the flavors. So let’s dish – when the dough is slack it means it’s held together but if you tried to shape it, it wouldn’t hold a shape. The butter will give it that rich flavor. What type/brand of bread flour are you using? Is it rising and everything else OK? I’ll help you through this 🙂

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

      • Erin says:

        It was lumpy as in it was hard to shape. It wouldn’t stretch and hold, it would snap back into a roll size ball, so for there to be enough bread, I had to kind of piece it together. After reading some more of the comments, I think I needed to add more water and let it go longer (beating until slack stage..?). I don’t know! What in the world I did. It rose beautifully, smelled right … Just didn’t taste good, I thought. My kind children and husband ate it up, but it wasn’t right! I had a couple of people say it was like pretzel bread (the denseness, anyway). It was King Arthur bread flour…,

        • TKWAdmin says:

          Hi Erin! Yes it sounds like it wasn’t slack yet which means it wasn’t mixed enough and as you said, possibly enough water. The water varies depending on where you live. If it’s more humid you need to add a bit less versus if it’s a drier climate you can add a tad more.

          Yep, KAF is the flour I use.

          This dough shouldn’t hold a shape – not before the first rise. That’s what slack means. It’s not runny but if you tried to shape it, it would just blob out. Make sense?

          Best Kitchen Wishes!

          • Erin says:

            It makes sense! I just didn’t get it to the slack stage. And I forgot about an addition I made, which is GREAT in my pizza dough recipe, but probably wasn’t the best idea trying this out for the first time — the “juice” from a jar of pickles jalapeños… Which I don’t think affected the flavor, but the vinegar would certainly affect the toughness of the dough… I had just made pizza dough and had it out, and tried it. Typically when making a recipe for the first time, I do it as is… But of course not the time I decide to ask for help! Ha… And it’s certainly dry here. so the next time I make these, I’ll have the denseness issue covered!! Hopefully the flavor, too… Thank you so much!

  • Tina says:

    Do you think it would work well to cut three slashes in the tops of this bread? Or will it ruin the look of the loafs? I know some bread recipes do not really work to score the tops. Also, I only have white and wheat flour, will it work to simply switch out the bread flour for my white flour? Thanks for your time!

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Tina!

      Why would you want to put the slashes on the bread? This isn’t an “Italian Bread” so it’s not that typical ‘crusty’ bread roll. These are tender and chewy. I’ll be honest I’ve never tried slashing them.

      So here’s the thing with this recipe – you need bread flour as you need that higher gluten/higher protein bread. That’s the key to that chewy texture. If you only have white and wheat, do you have any vital wheat gluten at home? I know, it’s not a common thing but I have to ask. If you go with just white or a combo of white/wheat you run the risk of a more dense/less chewy bread.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Steve says:

    Quick question on the freezing of these I saw a post that said they could be frozen can you please explain a little more about that. Such as can the dough be made than frozen to make them later if so should they be shaped first? Or do they have to be made, baked, cooled then frozen?
    Thanks in advance
    Ciao

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Hi Steve!

      You have a few choices here. If you want to freeze them, let them rise first, then shape. Once you shape them flash freeze them (meaning place them on a parchment lined tray and place directly into the freezer until frozen solid. Once solid, wrap them up and store for 2 months in the freezer. Or you can make them, let them cool completely and then freeze (well that is, after you wrap them completely).

      One thing to keep in mind when you freeze the ‘raw’ dough is it has to be left in the fridge overnight to thaw completely before the second rise and baking.

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

  • Sebastian says:

    You can only get a decent hoagie roll in german cities that have/had a US presence, and therefor feature real sandwich bars (not that Subway crap). Born in Bamberg, a small town blessed with over 60 years of US Army on site, I grew up on subs, hoagies and heroes. But cruel fate: 18 years ago I moved to Leipzig, a barren wasteland when it comes to sandwiches. I went to at least 10 bakeries, asking if they knew hoagies – nope. I tried over a dozen recipes, and non of them were the real deal. And then I found yours.

    I don’t think you can even begin to grasp what that first bite into that perfect hoagie – now available whenever I want it – meant to me. I cried. A man and his sandwich, finally together. Thank you.

    • TKWAdmin says:

      Sebastian how I so wish you were here to see my face when I read your comment. You truly made my day and brought a tear to my eye. THANK YOU! It means so much to me when people leave comments. I so happy that after all these years now you can make your hoagies as often as you want and you never have to go without!

      Best line ever… “A man and his sandwich, finally together.” I’ll forever remember this. Thank you again!

      Best Kitchen Wishes!

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